Friday, September 30th, 2016

New Research: Flexible Film Packaging Can be Recycled

 

production of blue household  garbage plastic bags

Flexible plastic packaging- resealable bags, pouches and other items- is becoming increasingly popular. This type of packaging protects more products and often does so with a lower environmental footprint than other packaging options. However, these materials have raised questions in materials recovery facilities (MRFs) about how they can be recycled after the end of their useful life. Luckily, a new report shows that, with the right sorting techniques, it’s very possible for single-stream MRFs to find new value in these increasingly common materials.

 

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Resource Recycling Systems (RSS) launched its initial research findings of the “Flexible Packaging Sortation at Materials Recovery Facilities” on behalf of Materials Recovery for the Future (MRFF) earlier this month. The project showed that automated sorting technologies in use today can be optimized to capture flexible plastic packaging—potentially creating a new stream of recovered materials while improving the quality of other recycling streams.

 

 

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RSS, in collaboration with brand owners and other trade associations on the project, including SPI: The Plastics Industry Association, conducted research trials that included baseline testing, equipment testing and other MRF sorting technologies like screens and optical scanners. This is only the first phase, however; future research will focus on further refinements to sorting technology, economic feasibility, assessing end-use markets for the material and developing a recovery facility demonstration project.

 

A few key findings:bag-chips

  • 88% of the flexible material by weight flowed with the fiber streams (defined as old newspaper (ONP) and mixed paper), making it feasible to capture the majority of the material.
  • Optical sorters correctly sorted 43% of seeded flexible plastic packaging by weight.
  • Once calibrated properly, optical sorting technologies were able to successfully separate over 90% (by weight) of the seeded flexible plastic packaging from fiber.

 

 

To access the full report, click here.

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Monday, September 26th, 2016

SPI and ACC Pick Up Riverside Litter for Coastal Cleanup Day

SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association and the American Chemistry Council (ACC), hosted a river clean up as part of the Ocean Conservancy‘s International Coastal Cleanup (ICC). The annual ICC is one of the largest volunteer events in the world where thousands of people volunteer their time to clean up the world’s coastlines and waterways.

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A group of about 60 volunteers gathered at Anacostia Park in Washington, DC. The afternoon began with opening remarks from Steve Russell, vice president of ACC’s Plastics Department, and Bill Carteaux, president and CEO of SPI (see images below).

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The volunteers were put into groups to tackle different areas of the river, picking up trash and logging items they found along the river bank. It was a great opportunity for two DC-based organizations to give back to the local community.

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Thank you to all of our volunteers, the National Capital Parks-East and the ICC!

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Friday, September 23rd, 2016

The FLiP Files: Jennifer Cioffi

The FLiP Files is a blog series spotlighting young professionals that are active in SPI’s Future Leaders in Plastics (FLiP), a group for plastics professionals under the age of 40.  For our next FLiP File, we spoke to FLiP member Jennifer Cioffi of Jarden Home Brands.

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-Where do you work and what’s your title? I’m the product compliance manager for Jarden Home Brands, a subsidiary of Newell Brands.

-Tell us a little about what your company does.

Newell Brands is a global consumer goods company with a portfolio of well-known brands, including Paper Mate®, Sha​rpie®, Coleman®, Oster®, Sunbeam®, Graco®, Calphalon®, Rubbermaid®, Goody® and Yankee Candle® to name a few!

-How did you find yourself working in the plastics industry?

When I graduated college, I was offered an opportunity to work in business development for a global consulting firm. My first exposure to plastics was working with companies that were seeking regulatory support in complying with global plastics regulations. I immediately knew that my passion was in ensuring that companies manufactured safe and compliant products.

-Has anyone in the industry mentored you? Absolutely—I’ve been fortunate to learn from a number of individuals in the additives and plastics industries. The best part has been learning about the history of plastics and how technology and the manufacturing of plastics have progressed over the last 50 years.

-Describe in one sentence what you do on an average day. A typical day for me consists of conducting regulatory evaluations of our products and developing compliance strategies, test protocols and certifications to ensure that our products meet all applicable regulatory requirements.

-What do you like most about working in the plastics industry? Definitely the innovation! Plastics are used in everything from food packaging to surgical devices. The versatility of plastics is something that amazes me and keeps me passionate about working in the industry.

-What’s one thing about your personal life that you feel has been changed by having a career in plastics? Plastics has become a common conversation topic in my household! Whether we’re taking about migration, safe-use, or recyclability, I enjoy educating family and friends about plastics.

-What are the major challenges you think are facing the plastics industry today? How do you think the industry can overcome them? One of the biggest challenges has to be mitigating the negative public perception of plastics. Many times a random blog post will go up which causes consumers to panic about the safety of plastics. The industry can overcome these challenges by continuing to educate consumers and by working with agencies to support the development of industry and consumer education.

-Why do you think someone from your generation should consider a career in plastics? Plastics are here for the long haul! When it comes to plastics, you’re always learning! There are so many career paths in plastics, whether it be in compliance, manufacturing, medical applications or active/intelligent packaging, the opportunities are endless!

-What’s one plastic product you couldn’t live without? My coffeemaker!

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

Operation Clean Sweep Celebrates 25 Years

25th_anniversary_logoOperation Clean Sweep (OCS) is a voluntary stewardship program for facilities that handle plastic materials. Administered jointly by SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association and the American Chemistry Council (ACC), OCS is designed to help facilities implement procedures to keep plastic materials out of our waterways and eliminate plastic pellet, flake and powder loss.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Operation Clean Sweep. Today OCS is being implemented in 23 countries around the world, by companies in 34 states in the U.S. Through the tireless efforts of OCS’ supporters and partners, the plastics industry has made significant strides towards zero plastic pellet, flake and powder loss. OCS is an ever-changing program, but the goal of eliminating pellet, flake and powder loss has not changed. Here’s a look back at some important milestones in OCS history.

 

1980s

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Center for Marine Conservation (now known as the Ocean Conservancy) conducted studies that detected plastic pellets in U.S. waterways from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

 

1986

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SPI began working towards a solution to contain plastic pellet loss, creating educational programs for the U.S. plastics industry. Additionally, SPI’s Resin Pellet Task Force was established to educate the plastics industry and consumers about the negative consequences of plastic pellets in the marine environment.

 

 

1991

Operation Clean Sweep was created by SPI. Companies throughout the plastics industry signed the pledge to work toward zero plastic pellet loss.

 

2004

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ACC partnered with SPI and created the OCS website, which offered an online manual, and other tools, to assist companies with implementing their own OCS program to reduce pellet loss.

 

2011

SPI released OCS as a royalty-free license for international plastic organizations, enabling organizations like the Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA), the Asociación Nacional de Industrias del Plástico (ANIPAC) and others to promote OCS to their own members and encouraging companies to implement the OCS guidelines at facilities all over the world.

 

2014

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OCS created a new supporter category allowing companies who do not directly manufacture or handle plastic materials to publically support the mission of OCS. Supporters of OCS pledge to encourage other companies, associations and coalitions to participate in OCS and educate customers, suppliers and member companies about the program.

 

 

 

 

 

2015

Two new categories of plastics materials, plastic flakes and powder, joined plastic pellets in the OCS mission statement. The addition of these two types of material widened the scope of OCS, expanding beyond one specific aspect of the plastic life cycle to welcome recyclers and other companies that regularly handle plastic materials.

 

2016

OCS 2.0 was launched. Now, OCS counts facilities rather than companies to give a more accurate representation of the industry.

 

2016 and Beyond  

Although OCS has made a positive impact on the plastics industry and the global marine environment, the program continues to expand through its growing number of global partnerships. No matter where your facility is located, OCS offers all plastics-handling companies an extensive manual of best management practices to implement, free of charge. If your company has not signed the pledge to join and participate in OCS, there has never been a better time to do so. Together, we can eventually achieve Operation Clean Sweep’s goal of zero pellet, flake, and powder loss.

 

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Friday, September 9th, 2016

Tips for Hosting Your Own MFG Day Event

Michael Stark, SPI FLiP Chairman

Michael Stark, SPI FLiP Chairman

SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association is once again sponsoring this year’s Manufacturing Day (MFG Day) on October 7 and is encouraging every company in the plastics industry to open their doors and host an event. This year, we’re following our own advice and hosting our first-ever Plastics Education & Career Fair. We’ll be promoting MFG Day participation through October. Here are some tips from Wittmann-Battenfeld’s Michael Stark, chairman of SPI’s Future Leaders in Plastics (FLiP), for how to make the most of an event at your company.

 

 

Tips for Hosting Your Own MFG Day Event from SPI-FLiP Chairman Michael Stark

 Wittmann-Battenfeld

  • Make it interactive. If your plan is to host elementary/middle school children, make sure you have some fun activities related to your company for them to participate in. Focus on the “cool” things that you do. If able, offer giveaways.
  • Highlight the soft and hard skills the plastics industry seeks. If you are hosting high school students, broaden your scope of what you are talking about. Offer up information on all disciplines within your company such as accounting, marketing, sales, engineering, operations, etc. If college bound, the majority of these students may not realize that the degree they want to go to school for can be used in manufacturing. Most will assume it’s just a trade job on the floor, operating machinery. This is your chance to break that misconception.new-1
  • Engage in one-on-one conversations. For college level or trade school students, make sure you allow one-on-one time with your employees, and also focus on the different disciplines at your company. The students that are interested will want to learn more than you can offer in a short tour. You will want to be able to take advantage of this.
  • Work with local schools to promote your event. If you only want to invite schools, call local guidance counselors early and schedule the time. Plan to contact at least 2-3 times the number of schools you are willing to host on your list, as many will not break free for a field trip, or will be otherwise unavailable.

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  • Promote, promote, promote. If you are inviting the public, the local newspaper is one of the best ways to get the word out. If you are willing to spend some money, then radio ads also work well. Most parents still read the newspaper and will catch the ad on the radio, and encourage their kids to go. Also, most newspapers include a posting of the ad on their webpage as part of the package.
  • Consider hosting on the weekends. If the general public is your main focus, then consider doing your event on a Saturday (you can still register it as an official Manufacturing Day event on the MFG Day website – www.mfgday.com). Consider doing it in the morning to avoid schedule conflicts with sporting events and other weekend activities that happen on weekdays.
  • Make flyers. Create a flyer to distribute to schools and the local newspaper. Make it flashy with one of the best photos of your company, the most attractive statistics you have about your company, and the opportunities your company and the industry has to offer.
  • Have fun! Lastly, don’t be afraid. Your first event will be a learning experience for you to find out what works and what doesn’t. After your first year, the event will become easier.tree