Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Why TSCA Reform Benefits Both the Public and the Plastics Industry

US CapitolThere’s much praise for both the House and Senate versions of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) legislation. Why? How does reforming a 40-year old piece of legislation impact an additive supplier in the value chain for an intricate piece in a larger finished product? Why should consumers be optimistic about the safety of future household products?

TSCA reform that is being negotiated by representatives from each chamber of Congress will update the 40-year-old regulatory framework to reflect today’s chemical manufacturing environment. In particular, we expect the negotiated version to overhaul the safety standards for chemicals entering the market, codify federal preemption language, and to protect confidential business information.

Here’s a look at what SPI and its members/stakeholders support:

Updated Safety Standards

TSCA will better define the safety standards that chemical manufacturers must meet so that consumers are more confident about the safety of chemicals in commerce. Costs and other non-risk factors should not be considered when evaluating the safety of a chemical. It is important TSCA consider potentially exposed subpopulations, such as children, to a chemical even under the intended conditions of use. Without these changes, it is difficult for businesses to demonstrate the safety of their products under the current, outdated regulatory system.

Federal Regulation to Preempt State Regulations

TSCA reform will reduce the need some states feel to step into the realm of chemical regulation. It’s more efficient for a company to comply with one federal regulation than it is to juggle 50 individual state regulations. The federal government recognizes this and is defining a threshold for states to implement their own regulatory standards.

Protect Confidential Business Information

Today’s TSCA reform outlines when information needs to be provided by private companies, but it also clarifies what is and is not protected. This confidence allows businesses to move forward with more innovative solutions to today’s chemical needs without worrying about disclosing trade secrets in the regulatory process.

U.S. manufacturers have made great strides in advancing chemical technology and use. These innovations make life as we know it possible. Unfortunately, the regulatory environment has not kept pace – but we expect this to change when negotiations conclude and a final bill is signed into law. We are confident that promising days lie ahead for those in the plastics industry impacted by TSCA.

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

Seven Ways You Can Make a Difference on Earth Day

The plastics industry’s best asset is its people; always has been, always will be. The nearly one million plastics professionals in the U.S. aren’t just the fuel of a $427 billion industry. Together they comprise a community of like-minded individuals who believe in the power of plastics to make the world a better, safer, greener place.

That’s why throughout the month of April, SPI is asking every plastics professional to pledge one act of green, using the hashtag #SPIEarthDay, to reduce their environmental impact this Earth Day, April 22, 2016 (4/22/2016). Here are seven small, individual acts of green that can collectively add up to big environmental changes:

Male hand putting plastic bottle in recycling bin1. Reusing and recycling: These are as relevant and important now as they ever have been. Whether it’s taking the bags back to the grocery store or taking your old electronics to a facility where they can have a new life, recycling and reusing plastic materials adds to their value and reduces their overall environmental footprint.

2. Waste avoidance: Composting isn’t just for hipsters and Portland residents anymore. Striving for zero food waste is a lot easier than you’d think, and that’s just the beginning. Paperless banking, double-sided printing and so many other simple steps can be taken to reduce or eliminate excess paper, plastic or any other material for that matter. For plastics professionals specifically, there’s also the Operation Clean Sweep guidelines that, when implemented properly, can eliminate pellet loss in your facilities, keeping those materials out of waterways, and in your machines and products where they belong.

3. Purchasing: The plastics industry promotes the use of recycled plastic content in products as a way to extend the lifecycle of the material. What better way to support and promote the use of recycled plastic than by buying products that use it in your own day-to-day purchasing decisions.

Showerhead4. Water: If you’re looking for a weekend project, try installing a low flow shower head, toilet or faucet, or planting some plants that require less water, installing rain barrels or investing in some drought resistant landscaping. If you’re not looking for a weekend project, do any of the above, and watch your water bills decline as you strike a blow for smarter management of humanity’s most valuable resource.

5. Energy Conservation: Even something as simple as washing your clothes with cold water, or unplugging your phone charger while it’s not in use, can, collectively, save a lot of energy, reduce your own carbon footprint and make a real difference.

BlogPhoto6_Transportation6. Transportation: So much of each individual’s environmental impact is comprised of the way one gets from one place to another. Cutting out one car trip, riding a bike or using public transportation are easy ways to decrease that impact without much hassle.

7. Team Up: Again, the plastics industry isn’t just an industry, but a community of people who believe in the unlimited potential of these materials to change lives, and to change the world. Consider teaming up with others this Earth Day, whether it’s with your fellow plastics professionals, your friends, your family, your neighbors or whoever, to augment the impact of your actions and spread the word that sustainability is everyone’s responsibility.

BlogPhoto7_Team

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

FLiP Rolls Out Mentorship Program

The traditional mentor-mentee (teacher-pupil, coach-player, etc.) relationship can often be thought of as a one-way street; knowledge, experience and wisdom flows from the former party to the latter, and not the other way around.

Ask anyone who’s taken the time to be a mentor though and you might find that things aren’t so linear. Just ask Jessica Bursack, communications manager for Jarden Process Solutions and leader of SPI’s Future Leaders in Plastics (FLiP) Mentorship Task Group. “I was nominated for the task group because I had experience working with mentor programs before,” she said. “I’ve been a mentee a number of times through careers and professional aspects, with people who took me under their wing and made sure to connect me with other people and taught me about the way trade shows work.”

Jessica Bursack

Jessica Bursack

Bursack has also been on the other side of the transaction too, coaching young adults in debate teams and mentoring them informally in the art of rhetoric. One experience was just as fulfilling as the other, she noted. “As a mentor, you learn how to inform, instruct and educate in a way that’s not intrusive,” Bursack said. “You see things so simply because you’ve been doing them for so long, that when you step back and realize that people are learning things for the first time, it humbles you.”

“It puts things in perspective,” she added.

In honor of National Mentoring Month, in January FLiP, led by Bursack’s task group, will soft launch its own plastics-specific mentorship program, aimed at delivering the benefits that only a solid mentor can provide, and, as an added bonus, opening doors for seasoned plastics professionals to share their knowledge while expanding their own horizons.

“We’re trying to engage the younger generation and we also want to maintain and retain the younger people that are already in the industry,” Bursack said. “Not only is the mentee going to benefit from the program by strengthening their skills and their knowledge of the industry, but it’ll also provide perspective for the mentors: they’re hearing something they may not have heard before and it might help them look at things differently.”

Bursack noted that the program is specifically designed not only to benefit mentors and mentees, but also plastics companies that are struggling to reach new and existing millennial employees. “It’s helpful when it comes to not only recruitment but also engagement and education,” she said. “Participants will have a sense of belonging but also a sense of ownership when they’re invested in it.”

FLiP_logo-2It doesn’t take an expert to see that in many ways, the millennial generation is different than those that preceded it. “Our generation is a lot different. Not ‘bad’ different, but different in the way that we look at how employers want to take care of us,” Bursack said, noting that getting involved with the FLiP mentorship program is one way to make it clear to millennial employees that their company cares about and is actively invested in their growth. “If younger people feel that sense of engagement, they’ll be easier to hire, and retain.”

A small pilot group of mentors and mentees has been selected for the first stage of the mentorship program rollout, but FLiP invites all companies, potential mentors and potential mentees to get involved today. Email Katie Masterson (kmasterson@plasticsindustry.org) to get involved.

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Less is Less – The Battle to Wrap It Up in Plastic

By Michael Taylor, Vice President International Affairs and Trade

When it comes to packaging – plastic is the environmental material of choice.

Plastic products are environmentally-friendly, and manufacturers who produce these versatile products take pride in their efforts to implement sensible green policies and procedures.

And, to quote David Tyler, a chemistry professor at the University of Oregon, “Plastic bags are greener than paper bags, disposable plastic cups have fewer impacts than reusable ceramic mugs, and owning a dog is worse than driving an SUV.” fish bottles

When you consider the entire “life-cycle” of packaging materials, plastics compare favorably to other materials in areas like energy and water use, air and greenhouse gas emissions and solid waste. It has been demonstrated that plastic packaging helps reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions compared to alternative materials.

How does plastic packaging help with sustainability? Simply put, plastic does more with less. It is more energy efficient to make plastic as opposed to other packaging materials, and it takes less lightweight plastic to package a product.

For example, two pounds of plastics can deliver roughly 10 gallons of beverages as compared to three pounds of aluminum, eight pounds of steel or more than 40 pounds of glass. Lighter packaging means less fuel is used in shipping. That is, plastic bags require less total energy to produce than paper bags,  and they conserve fuel in shipping (ie., one truckload for plastic bags versus seven for paper).

Replacing plastic packaging with non-plastic alternatives in the United States would:

  • Require 4.5 times as much packaging material by weight, increasing the amount of packaging used in the U.S. by nearly 55 million tons (110 billion pounds);
  • Increase energy use by 80 percent—equivalent to the energy from 91 oil supertankers; and
  • Result in 130 percent more global warming potential—equivalent to adding 15.7 million more cars to our roads.

And plastics engineers continually work to do even more with less—this process of light-weighting can help boost the environmental and economic efficiency of consumer product packaging. Since 1977, the two-liter plastic soft drink bottle shrunk from 68 grams to 47 grams, representing a 31 percent reduction per bottle. This saved more than 180 million pounds of packaging in 2006—just for two-liter soft drink bottles alone. The one-gallon plastic milk jug succeeded on a similar diet, weighing 30 percent less today than 20 years ago.

Next to lightweight (or source reduction), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency identifies “reuse” of packaging as the next highest priority in managing waste. Plastics packaging’s durability enables reusability in storage bins, sealable food containers and refillable sports bottles. And 90 percent of Americans report that they reuse plastic bags.

In summary, plastic is the smart material of choice because it’s light, inexpensive, versatile – and recyclable.

To learn more about plastic packaging, please view SPI’s latest Market Watch report,  “Packaging Market Watch: Plastics Wraps it Up”. It may be accessed by visiting SPI’s website at http://www.plasticsindustry.org/.

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

Congress: We Urge Prompt Attention to Passing the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act

CongressSunriseViewThe U.S. Congress has a great opportunity to come together and provide tax relief to both American families and the businesses in which they work.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act would resolve four key issues that affect plastics. Specifically, the PATH Act would:

  • Permanently extend the Research & Development Tax Credit – This has the potential to unlock a great deal of innovation in the plastics industry.
  • Extend “Bonus Depreciation” for Five Years – Bonus depreciation is an added amount of depreciation that can be claimed by a business on property it acquired and placed in service during 2015 through 2019. This facilitates new purchases of equipment.
  • Permanently Extend Section 179 “Small Business Expensing” – The bill locks in the small business expensing limitation at $500,000, lifting it from its current $25,000 ceiling.
  • Place a Two-Year Moratorium on the Medical Device Excise Tax – Due to their superior design flexibility, plastics are increasingly used in medical devices. This tax harms job creation and stymies innovation in the medical device sector.

Combined, these provisions would greatly benefit the public, and anyone who touches or is involved in the plastics’ supply chain.

We encourage both members of the U.S. House and U.S. Senate to act quickly to advance this bipartisan bill.