Friday, October 14th, 2016

Manufacturing Day 2016: SPI Staff Reflections

After wrapping up yet another successful Manufacturing (MFG) Day, several SPI staff members who attended MFG Day events at plastics facilities across the nation shared their experience about what made this year’s events so special and the incredible things plastics companies had on tap for their events.

Kendra Martin, Senior Director, Industry Affairs – Brand Owners

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I took my children – ages 11 and 13 – with me to spend Manufacturing Day 2016 at The Rodon Group in Hatfield, PA. Rodon hosted nearly 50 students from local tech schools, high schools and colleges. We began the visit with a presentation and several videos about the future of manufacturing and the variety of career opportunities it offers. We then took a tour of the factory (ours led by K’NEX creator Joel Glickman!), which gave us a chance to see the design, tooling and manufacturing processes in action, and watched Baxter, a collaborative manufacturing robot from Rethink Robotics, at work.

For the kids (and me), the most fun part of the day was seeing all the very cool robotics throughout the factory, such as machines making the K’NEX construction pieces and a bunch of amazing models and portraits made out of the interlocking toys. Oh, and seeing the pictures of when President Obama visited the plant in 2012. One of the Presidential helicopters landed in the open field next to Rodon’s facility!

David Palmer, Director, Industry Affairs – Equipment Council

For those of us who celebrated Manufacturing Day at Wittmann Battenfeld in Torrington, Connecticut, we were treated to three days of spectacular events, including the company’s Open House & Innovations Workshop and SPI’s Northeast Regional Plant Tour and Dinner.

More than 100 students from nearby Oliver Wolcott High School visited Wittmann Battenfeld on MFG Day and employees rolled out the maroon carpet for their guests. We were privileged to tour their facilities and sit in on various presentations and demonstrations of the company’s injection molding machines and auxiliary equipment: dryers, blenders and granulators.

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For me, there were two memorable moments of the day. One was seeing the presentations by SPE’s PlastiVan program. Margie Weiner’s experiments were pure infotainment. One student who was so dazzled by a particular experiment involving polymers yelled out, “What?Is that magic?” Students learned a lot about the science of plasticsand the possibilities of doing pretty cool stuff in a plastics career. The other memorable moment was seeing Ronnie the BroBot moving about the building interacting with visitors. Amazing! That robot was so lifelike.

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Katie Masterson, Senior Program Manager, Industry Affairs – Equipment Council

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My day started off at Parkinson Technologies where I shadowed an “Introduction to Engineering” high school class. There were about 15 students in that tour, but Parkinson had over 50 students from local high schools tour their facility for MFG Day. Congressman David Cicilline also came and toured their facility. By the end of the tour, students could distinguish between different types of plastics machinery used for different types of plastics materials. They also had a better idea of the various types of jobs offered at a manufacturing facility.

 

 

I then made my way to Yushin America which opened their facility to their community and scheduled tours for every 15 minutes based on demand. They had about 140 people attend their event. I waslucky enough to shadow a tour with local high school students. This school attended previous Yushin MFG Days events and continues to bring their students on an annual basis because they understand the value of MFG Day. Yushin did a great job explaining the workforce shortage and all the various job opportunities at Yushin, and the required training and education. They noted that they’re always looking for employees who have interest, drive and ability.

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Rachel Cervarich, Digital Marketing Specialist

Attending Wittmann Battenfeld’s MFG Day event was enlightening. Being new to the plastics industry, I had never been to a manufacturing facility before. Seeing a facility where equipment is made definitely created a thirst for knowledge about manufacturing. I’d love to see a processing facility next and learn how the machines I saw being built go on to create plastic products.

The students who toured the facility had similar reactions. Many of them commented on the cleanliness of the facility and the advanced technology of the machines. Every student I spoke to said they hadn’t imagined a career in plastics before MFG Day and now could picture themselves in plastics. They realized that you may start on the floor, but you can work your way to sales and even management positions. It was fantastic to hear such positive, impressed reactions from students.

 

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Friday, September 9th, 2016

Tips for Hosting Your Own MFG Day Event

Michael Stark, SPI FLiP Chairman

Michael Stark, SPI FLiP Chairman

SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association is once again sponsoring this year’s Manufacturing Day (MFG Day) on October 7 and is encouraging every company in the plastics industry to open their doors and host an event. This year, we’re following our own advice and hosting our first-ever Plastics Education & Career Fair. We’ll be promoting MFG Day participation through October. Here are some tips from Wittmann-Battenfeld’s Michael Stark, chairman of SPI’s Future Leaders in Plastics (FLiP), for how to make the most of an event at your company.

 

 

Tips for Hosting Your Own MFG Day Event from SPI-FLiP Chairman Michael Stark

 Wittmann-Battenfeld

  • Make it interactive. If your plan is to host elementary/middle school children, make sure you have some fun activities related to your company for them to participate in. Focus on the “cool” things that you do. If able, offer giveaways.
  • Highlight the soft and hard skills the plastics industry seeks. If you are hosting high school students, broaden your scope of what you are talking about. Offer up information on all disciplines within your company such as accounting, marketing, sales, engineering, operations, etc. If college bound, the majority of these students may not realize that the degree they want to go to school for can be used in manufacturing. Most will assume it’s just a trade job on the floor, operating machinery. This is your chance to break that misconception.new-1
  • Engage in one-on-one conversations. For college level or trade school students, make sure you allow one-on-one time with your employees, and also focus on the different disciplines at your company. The students that are interested will want to learn more than you can offer in a short tour. You will want to be able to take advantage of this.
  • Work with local schools to promote your event. If you only want to invite schools, call local guidance counselors early and schedule the time. Plan to contact at least 2-3 times the number of schools you are willing to host on your list, as many will not break free for a field trip, or will be otherwise unavailable.

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  • Promote, promote, promote. If you are inviting the public, the local newspaper is one of the best ways to get the word out. If you are willing to spend some money, then radio ads also work well. Most parents still read the newspaper and will catch the ad on the radio, and encourage their kids to go. Also, most newspapers include a posting of the ad on their webpage as part of the package.
  • Consider hosting on the weekends. If the general public is your main focus, then consider doing your event on a Saturday (you can still register it as an official Manufacturing Day event on the MFG Day website – www.mfgday.com). Consider doing it in the morning to avoid schedule conflicts with sporting events and other weekend activities that happen on weekdays.
  • Make flyers. Create a flyer to distribute to schools and the local newspaper. Make it flashy with one of the best photos of your company, the most attractive statistics you have about your company, and the opportunities your company and the industry has to offer.
  • Have fun! Lastly, don’t be afraid. Your first event will be a learning experience for you to find out what works and what doesn’t. After your first year, the event will become easier.tree

Wednesday, August 31st, 2016

Hear about the Benefits of Pursuing Zero Net Waste from SPI’s First-Ever Zero Net Waste-Designated Company

ZNWLogoWhen The Minco Group and its All Service Plastic Molding (ASPM) subsidiary set out to achieve Zero Net Waste using SPI’s program, it couldn’t have known how it would impact its operations, or its bottom line. But Minco Program Manager Andy Brewer, with the support of Vice President Dan Norris, organized and led a company Green Team which implemented the program and started monitoring their progress.

The numbers don’t lie.

Since putting the Zero Net Waste program’s tools and resources to use in their facility, ASPM has:

  • Diverted 88 percent of their total manufacturing waste away from the landfill.
  • Organized a 24-hour sort of ASPM waste.
  • Categorized their waste materials into 26 categories.
  • Decreased landfill-bound waste weights by 46 percent.
  • Projected a revenue increase of approximately $20,000 for 2017, based on their enhanced recycling efforts.

These aren’t the only benefits the company recognized by pursuing Zero Net Waste. SPI also named The Minco Group the first company to ever achieve its Zero Net Waste designation, which announces to the industry, and to the world at large, that the company has successfully taken steps to eliminate waste in plastics manufacturing in its facilities.

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Minco’s Andy Brewer

The first steps, according to Brewer, were getting involved, getting buy-in, and building a team. “I’ve been working with [SPI’s Senior Director of Recycling & Diversion] Kim Holmes’ Recycling Committee and knew that my company was capable of doing our part to make the industry more sustainable,” said Brewer. “I was able to get buy-in from my colleagues by organizing a 24-hour sort in which they learned about all of the many recyclable materials we send to the landfill, in error, every day. From there, our Green Team, which manages our recycling efforts, was born.”

Brewer will lead an upcoming webinar to discuss the other benefits beyond projected revenue increases that he and his company have experience since they set about eliminating waste from their facilities. Register here and learn how your company can engage its employees and help the environment all while enhancing its bottom line through the Zero Net Waste program.

Friday, August 19th, 2016

A New Study May Make Conversations about Plastics Easier

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Steve Russell, vice president of the American Chemistry Council’s Plastics Division

A guest post by Steve Russell, vice president of the American Chemistry Council’s Plastics Division.

Has this happened to you? You’re at a dinner party or family gathering or neighborhood get-together. Someone asks you what you do. A conversation about plastics ensues. And you struggle to find a really simple way to explain plastics’ many benefits and contributions to sustainability.

I’m guessing we’ve all been there.  And the answer just got easier to explain.

New study

A new study by the environmental consulting firm Trucost uses “natural capital accounting” methods that measure and value environmental impacts, such as consumption of water and emissions to air, land, and water. The authors describe it as the largest natural capital cost study ever conducted for the plastics manufacturing sector.

The results?  “Plastics and Sustainability: A Valuation of Environmental Benefits, Costs, and Opportunities for Continuous Improvement,” finds that the environmental cost of using plastics in consumer goods and packaging is nearly four times less than if plastics were replaced with alternative materials.

Trucost found that replacing plastics with alternatives would increase environmental costs associated with consumer goods from $139 billion to $533 billion annually.

Why is that? Predominantly because strong, lightweight plastics help us do more with less material, which provides environmental benefits throughout the lifecycle of plastic products and packaging. While the environmental costs of alternative materials can be slightly lower per ton of production, they are greater in aggregate due to the much larger quantities of material needed to fulfill the same purposes as plastics.

Think about it. Every day, strong, lightweight plastics allow us to ship more product with less packaging, enable our vehicles to travel further on a gallon of gas, and extend the shelf-life of healthful foods and beverages. And all of these things help reduce energy use, carbon emissions, and waste.

Why do this study?

This new study follows an earlier report called “Valuing Plastics (2014)” that Trucost conducted for the United Nation’s Environment Programme (UNEP). “Valuing Plastics” was Trucost’s first examination of environmental cost of using plastics. While clearly an important study, it begged the key question: compared to what? After all, consumer goods need to be made out of something.

So ACC’s Plastics Division commissioned Trucost to compare the environmental costs of using plastics to alternative materials, as well as to identify opportunities to help plastics makers lower the environmental costs of using plastics. The expanded study also broadened the scope of the earlier work to include use and transportation, thus providing a more complete picture of the full life cycle of products and packaging.

We see “Plastics and Sustainability” as a contribution to the burgeoning and vital global discussion on sustainability. Like any single study, it doesn’t “prove” that plastics are always better for the environment than alternatives. But it is an important study based on a rigorous and transparent methodology. And it provides a fuller picture of the environmental benefits of using plastics.

“Plastics and Sustainability” provides the plastics value chain with important information on plastics and sustainability so that we all can make better decisions. The entire plastics value chain is engaged in discussions with policymakers, brand owners, retailers, recyclers – and consumers – about how to be good corporate citizens and contribute to sustainability. A better understanding of the life cycle of materials will better inform these discussions and should lead all of us to more sustainable materials management decisions. This study’s findings also will help inform us how to further reduce the environmental cost of plastics.

In other words, making smart choices about what we produce and how we produce it will benefit people and the planet.

New perspective

So in light of this new study, next time you or I struggle for the right words, perhaps let’s try this:

“Did you know that replacing plastics with alternatives would actually increase environmental costs by nearly four times?”

Let me know how it goes.

You can find more information about the Trucost study and some interesting visualizations of the findings here.

Friday, August 5th, 2016

Sustainability in the Olympics: Striving to Set a Gold Standard

Rio de Janeiro, Sugarloaf Mountain by Sunset

Every four years, millions around the world turn their attention to the Olympic Games and watch athletes bike, flip, swim and run to represent their respective countries in the global competition. While spectators and athletes alike have their eyes set on bringing home the gold, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has set its own goal to minimize its environmental impact. Over the years, the Olympic Games have provided a global stage for brands and corporations to launch innovative, sustainable projects. Check out this timeline below.

1994

The IOC adopted “Environment” as a principle of Olympism. This new principle signified the start of a unified effort to make greener plans for the world’s largest sporting event.

2000

During the Sydney games, eco-friendly athletic attire had its Olympic debut when two runners crossed the finish line sporting Nike’s first recycled PET clothing.

2004

The Olympic Games returned “home” to Athens for the first time since 1896. Planners installed special disposal bins for plastic bottles to help manage the environmental pressure that comes with hosting an event attended by millions.

2008

In the Beijing games, Nike’s PET athletic line returned to the spotlight when track and field athletes from 17 different countries sported the uniforms. Coca-Cola joined the team and gave every Olympic athlete a t-shirt created with PET from five recycled water bottles. The shorts sported the slogan “I am from Earth” on the front to signify the unified effort to preserve the environment.

Sprinter getting ready to start the race

2012

Basketball teams from Brazil, China and USA competed for the top spot in Nike shorts and uniforms made from 100 percent recycled polyester, respectively, which saved an average of 22 bottles per uniform. In addition, American sprinters wore tracksuits that were each made of material from 13 recycled water bottles.

2016

At this year’s Rio de Janeiro Olympics, Brazil highlighted its host country pride by installing a sculpture of the Olympic rings in Copacabana. The installation, which is 3 meters tall and 6 meters wide, was created using 65 kilograms of recycled plastic.  In addition, the medals will be held around athletes’ necks by ribbons composed of recycled plastic bottles.

  Olympic gold medal