Monday, April 21st, 2014

Mend it like Beckham with a Plastics Air Boot

By Michael Salmon, Public Affairs Manager

We’ve all seen the impact plastics has in the medical arena, but the role plastics play in a medical situation really hit home at SPI recently when our own Tracy Cullen, the senior vice president of communications and marketing, had a fall and broke her foot. A majority of the plastic air boot Tracy was fitted with is made of plastic.

Bota Shell Air Ankle Walker

Bota Shell Air Ankle Walker

“My orthopaedic doctor outfitted me with a lightweight, removable plastic boot,” Cullen explained.  “It is made of a durable, semi-rigid plastic shell, and four air cells line the boot to support my foot and ankle … I simply use a plastic hand bulb to inflate and deflate the air cells as needed for a snug fit, and I’m told that  this compression will reduce swelling and pain.

The boot, a.k.a. the Bota Shell Air Ankle Walker, is made by Breg, Inc. of Carlsbad, California. The shell “offers the same support, comfort and compliance as Breg’s Vectra product line with the added convenience of a lightweight, durable, semi-rigid shell,” of plastic.

Tracy was instructed to remove the air boot to flex and exercise her foot, ankle and leg muscles  in order to prevent stiffness and muscle atrophy. And that’s precisely why this type of plastic air boot is now commonly used to treat professional athletes like David Beckam, Wayne Rooney and others who suffer from Metatarsal fractures, sprained or broken ankles. It reduces pain and overall healing time so professional athletes and association execs alike can quickly get back in the game.

It wasn’t too long ago when the doctors would have broken out the plaster and made a bulky cast on Tracy’s foot, but in the past few decades, plastics have made health care simpler and less painful. They have reduced healing time, relieved pain and cut medical costs.

“I’ll be in my air boot through my rehabilitation period until I am ready to start walking normally,” Cullen said.  “I’ll simply start walking while still in the plastic boot—there is a tough rubber sole to provide traction.”

To complement the cast, Tracy is also using a knee scooter in lieu of crutches for enhanced mobility. The knee scooter is another medical device that benefits greatly from plastics. The wheels, leg rest and brake cable coverings are all products of the plastics industry. “Crutches are so 19th century,” Cullen joked as she rolled down the hall.

As has been mentioned in previous blog posts, the plastics industry is responsible for much advancement in the world of medicine. State-of-the-art medical equipment utilizes plastic and helps people recover, rehabilitate, and regain their quality of life. Whether it is medical equipment such as stethoscopes made using polypropylene and polystyrene, or disposable medical applications (blood bags, tubing, catheters, examination gloves and inhalation masks as examples) made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or polyurethane, or incubator domes made from acrylic or polycarbonate to defend premature infants against infection, plastics are there.

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

Plastics Industry Leaders Clean Up the Beach While in Miami

By Michael Salmon, Public Affairs Manager

Bottles, aluminum cans, food wrappers, rubber tires and even a discarded grill were among items pulled from the Crandon Park beach in Miami during a beach clean up event hosted by the Ocean Conservancy and SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association.  The beach cleanup kicked off SPI’s National Board Meeting  held in a nearby Miami hotel.

SPI President and CEO William R. Carteaux and VP Patty Long didn’t hesitate to wade through knee-deep water for trash.

SPI President and CEO William R. Carteaux and VP Patty Long didn’t hesitate to wade through knee-deep water for trash.

As the bus of 40 to 45 SPI staff and association members pulled up to the beach, Miami-Dade County Park coordinator Alex Martinez noted that “with this number of people collecting the trash, we’ll actually get something done.”

SPI President and Chief Executive Officer William R. Carteaux slipped on a pair of rubber gloves and led the group, wading through the knee-deep water at times. After a couple of hours in the water and scouring the underbrush, SPI members and staff collected nearly three pickup trucks full of trash from a particular section of beach. At one point, association member Tad Mcguire and SPI staffer Michael Taylor pulled out a rusty tent supporter, claiming lightheartedly, “we’re the plastics industry, we’re not quitting.”

The following day, SPI presented a check to Miami-Dade Park Service official Bill Ahern for the Sea Turtle Conservation Program. Ahern and his wife Selina Mills originally met while on a sea turtle preservation event, and have put much effort into their preservation during the last 25 years.  The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recognizes Ahern’s efforts behind turtle preservation and issued a permit for further work in that area, conducting  turtle surveys, relocating nests, hatchling releases and other duties regarding marine turtles.

In addition to welcoming new members and association business at the meeting, SPI promoted its zero waste initiative, as well as their ongoing concern to mitigate the trash in the oceans and waterways. It is a feature in SPI’s new magazine, titled Marine Debris: A Deep Dive into the Science & Solutions.

Monday, April 7th, 2014

Hilex Poly Busts Myths About Plastics in Marine Environment

By Philip R. Rozenski, Director of Sustainability for Hilex Poly Company LLC, Policy Chair for the American Progressive Bag Alliance

As a leading American plastic bag manufacturer in the United States and operator of the nation’s largest closed-loop plastic bag recycling facility, Hilex Poly understands the importance of keeping plastic bags and films out of the environment and in the recycling stream. While we would love to Bag2Bag Logoeliminate all waste (and have in fact invested tens of millions of dollars in recycling programs), we recognize that there are times when various plastics are improperly disposed of and end up in places where they don’t belong.

At the same time, myths about plastic bag waste and litter continue to receive media and NGO (nongovernmental organization) attention that distorts our true litter problems. A perfect example where this can be seen is with marine debris. Contrary to what many people believe to be the truth, not only do plastic bags constitute a minute amount of the total overall marine litter, plastic bags are unfairly grouped with other littered items that serve as much larger threats to marine life.

BAG-2-BAG RECYCLING

To further reduce the likelihood of plastic bags becoming litter, Hilex has taken an aggressive, proactive approach to increase the amount of plastic bags that are recycled and makes recycling all plastic films convenient for consumers across the country. Through our Bag-2-Bag Recycling Program, we have distributed more than 32,000 recycling collection bins across 45 states, allowing millions of consumers to easily recycle plastic bags and wraps at grocery stores and retailers. Proving this program’s success, our recycling center in North Vernon, Ind., recycled more than 20 million pounds of bags, sacks and wraps in 2012 alone.

Bags created in our Bag-2-Bag program are made of recycled content, lower carbon emissions by 11 percent, require 20 percent less energy to produce, reduce the need for virgin material and divert millions of pounds from landfills each year through this closed-loop process. We are extremely proud that the time, money and resources we have invested in this program are paying off.

BUSTING MYTHS

We look forward to a day when the myths about plastic bag waste, including those surrounding marine debris, are recognized for what they are: myths. In the meantime, Hilex will continue to focus on solutions that make a real difference in protecting our environment. We are proud of our products, the many innovative ways people reuse them in their daily lives, and our Bag-2-Bag program which supports an effective way for consumers to recycle the plastic bags they don’t reuse – by turning them into new bags or other useful products.

Friday, March 28th, 2014

NPE2015 Recycling Plan Creates Opportunity for CPR Inc.

By Kim Coghill, SPI, Director, CommunicationsBen 2

SPI’s commitment to reduce the environmental impact of its activities is evident in its requirement that NPE2015 exhibitors divert all scrap materials generated on the show floor from landfills.

Through a highly selective process, Commercial Plastics Recycling Inc., a Tampa, Fla.-based firm, has been named the NPE2015 official recycler, said Lori Campbell, SPI’s director of trade show operations. CPR was selected among a field of eight recycling firms that expressed interest, including three that submitted proposals. The NPE2015 Executive Committee chose CPR based on criteria such as the company’s ability to manage the abundance of material produced for recycling at NPE2015.  CPR is the only recycling firm permitted to remove plastics scrap created by exhibitors.

While the NPE recycling program for NPE2012 handled 260,208 pounds (118 metric tons) of material, the total of NPE2015 is likely to be greater, Campbell said. NPE2015 will take place March 23-27, 2015, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., where more than 2,000 companies are expected to fill one million square feet of exhibit space.

“NPE2015 is an opportunity to celebrate the plastics industry, and we’re excited to be part of it as the official recycler and as an exhibitor,” said Ben Benvenuti, CPR’s president and founder. “CPR will provide exhibitors with quality recycling services and the value they expect at the show.”

CPR will work directly with company representatives in planning, scheduling and removing all scrap material, which will be recycled at its Tampa facility, fewer than 70 miles from the site of NPE2015.  Providing exhibitors with an official recycler eliminates the burden of expenses associated with removal of recyclable material.

Cpr - NIE“SPI encourages companies to establish an effective and economical waste reduction/recycling plan for NPE2015. It is our goal to demonstrate to members, brand owners, show participants, media and the public the strides our industry is making in both the products we produce, as well as the methods our industry is taking to help us fulfill SPI’s mission of zero waste,” Campbell said.

Benvenuti added that CPR will work with exhibitors from booth setup to the end of the show at minimal cost. “We’ll work directly with exhibitors to schedule our services, provide more packaging than in the past, to facilitate collection and provide more support staff on the show floor,” he said.

Founded in 1996, CPR employs just under 70 people plus about 15 temporary staffers across facilities in St. Louis, Miss., Millwood, W.V., and Newton, N.C. CPR helps companies implement recycling programs that reduce the impact on the planet, cut costs associated with waste-hauling and provide competitive pricing for plastic material.

Ben Benvenuti, CPR’s president and founder, is pictured above. 

 

Monday, March 24th, 2014

RPPG Begins Setting Agenda for Future

By Patty Long, SPI Vice President, Industry Affairs

SPI and the American Chemistry Council’s (ACC) Plastics Division in 2013 agreed to partner to align the initiatives and programs of ACC’s Rigid Plastics Packaging Group (RPPG) with the resources and membership of SPI’s Thermoformers Committee. The group, which held its organizational meeting in early March, will advocate on behalf of rigid plastics packaging, work to advance their products as a sustainable choice for brand owners and retailers, advocate against unnecessary regulation, and work to increase access to collection and recycling.

Daniel F. Mohs and Greg Peters will lead the newly-formed Rigid Plastics Packaging Group (RPPG) as chairman and vice chairman, respectively. The two were elected to their posts during the group’s first organizational meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Others who will sit on the Executive Committee are:

• Brad Crosby, Airlite Plastics Co., Omaha, Neb., Executive Committee
• Brent Beeler, Berry Plastics Corp., Evansville, Ind., Executive Committee
• Holli Whitt, Eastman Chemical Co., Kingsport, Tenn., Executive Committee
• Thomas J. Kuehn, Plastics Ingenuity Inc., Cross Plains, Wis., Executive Committee
• James A. Clark, Printpack Inc., Williamsburg, Va., Executive Committee
• Jordan Robertson, StackTeck Systems Inc., Brampton, ON, Canada, Executive Committee
• Mike Moran, The Dow Chemical Co., Houston, Executive Committee
• Mohs is employed by Placon Corp., Madison, Wis.
• Greg Peters is employed by Plastic Enterprises Corp. (IPL Inc.), Lees Summit, Mo.

Membership is open to all suppliers, plastic processors, converters and brand owners in the rigid plastic packaging supply chain. SPI’s new RPPG focuses on consumer product and food service packaging, and is a resin-neutral trade association group.

The RPPG will meet twice a year in person – once in the spring, with a golf tournament and an educational field trip, and once in the fall – with educational webinars and advocacy discussions in between the in-person meetings. Subcommittees on communicating the value of rigid plastic packaging and addressing end-of-life issues/opportunities provide additional engagement opportunities for interested members.

SPI RPPG members who attended the spring meeting helped lay the framework for the group, nevertheless there’s remains an opportunity to help shape this group by participating in the subcommittees and webinars. Projects for 2014 include writing two case studies on sun-setting projects (SPI/NAPCOR’s Thermoforming Project, and the SPI/ACC Virginia Peninsula Rigid Recycling Project); however, additional, new project ideas are still being discussed.

Plenty of good work and active discussions took place at the spring meeting, both in and out of the conference rooms. The meeting included a well-attended golf tournament, and a tour of The Walt Disney WorldTM Waste Management facilities, with time set aside to converse with Walt Disney staff on how the theme parks handles recycling, waste management and litter. The SPI RPPG mixes business with fun, interactive networking opportunities. We are working to unite the rigid plastic packaging industry. With the exciting partnership of the SPI and ACC in forming the SPI RPPG, I hope you will consider participating.

Attending companies included:

Polytainers, Berry Plastics, CBW Automation, Printpack, Airlite Plastics, Klockner Pentaplast, NatureWorks, Dow Chemical, Fabri-Kal, Fame Technology Solutions, Plastic Ingenuity, Plastic Package, Placon, LyondellBasell, Verstaete, IPL, StackTeck, Marbach Tool & Equipment, Eastman Chemical, and the Brueckner Group USA.