Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

How the President and Vice President Came to Visit SPI Member Techmer PM

Three carloads of Secret Service personnel arrived at SPI member Techmer PM’s plant on Jan. 3, and they didn’t leave for another six days. “They never left our plant until the president was gone,” said John Manuck, Techmer’s chairman and CEO.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden visited Techmer’s Clinton, Tenn. facility on Jan. 9, touring the plant as part of an effort to promote American manufacturing and spotlight the creation of the administration’s newest manufacturing innovation hub. While the visit only lasted about an hour, its origins for Techmer were years in the making.TechmerWebShelbyCobra

To paraphrase Hemingway, a visit from the president and vice president happens two ways: gradually, then suddenly. “The Department of Energy (DOE) is always looking for collaboration with private industry,” Manuck said. “About two years ago, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (a DOE facility) became familiar with our capabilities and asked us to join them in a project of theirs in developing a new process to produce carbon fiber.” After his company connected with Oak Ridge, which is a 30-minute drive away from Techmer’s Clinton facility, Manuck said his company began working with the lab enough to build a relationship.

Then, early in 2014, Oak Ridge approached Techmer about a 3D printing project. “The word kind of got around that there’s this company down the road and we’re really easy to work with,” he said. Techmer and Oak Ridge began working and the results were two 3D-printed cars: one that Manuck said “was more like a dune buggy” and contained some of Techmer’s materials, and another that was a replica Shelby Cobra made entirely from Techmer’s materials.

But the two vehicles weren’t the only fruit that the positive working relationship between Techmer and Oak Ridge would eventually come to bear. When the White House began to plan its trip to the Knoxville area shortly after the 3D printing project had been completed, they naturally reached out to Oak Ridge, whose directors suggested that the president include a visit to Techmer’s facility.

Tom Drye, managing director of Techmer’s Engineered Solutions subsidiary and the company’s main point of contact for Oak Ridge, eventually received a phone call from the White House on Dec. 23, 2014, when staff members called asking for photos of the facility. Manuck managed to get hold of his assistant, who swore herself to secrecy both for security reasons and because by that point, only two short weeks before the visit actually happened, it still was not a guarantee. The day after Christmas Techmer’s phones rang again, with officials saying that they wanted a smaller Secret Service team to visit their facility the next Friday, Jan. 2. “We were scheduled to be closed that day and we let them know that, but that was actually probably a good thing to keep this confidential,” Manuck said.

TechmerWebObamaEventually more Secret Service members arrived, and the security protocols began, a process Manuck described as a “learning experience.” “I guess since the assassination attempt on President Reagan, the Secret Service does not like the president getting in and out of a car in a public place,” he said. “They pull the car inside, so they wanted to come in the back of the plant and we had to move some storage racks, which we did.”

While securing Techmer’s facility, Manuck also happened upon a new application for some of the company’s materials. “Our Gaylord boxes are filled with plastic pellets, and the Secret Service guys saw them and said ‘a bullet couldn’t get through this,’” he said. “So they had us move the Gaylords, and wherever he (the President) was going to go, we had a path laid out, part of which was made by stacking Gaylords where we wouldn’t normally have them.”

The day of the actual visit there was a final security follow-up from 7am-9am (“Bomb sniffing dogs, the whole thing,” according to Manuck) and then eventually, upon the President’s arrival, Manuck led him on a tour and had a chance to talk with the President. “I had made notes, and some were what I’ll call ‘self-promotional’ notes,” he said. “I wanted to promote manufacturing in the United States. I wanted to promote private companies, and that how, as a private company, we’re nimble. Most of these I was able to talk to the president about. We had a real dialogue, and that was my intention.”

Certain questions Manuck was able to prepare for ahead of time. “He was going to pepper me with questions. He’s not going to try to trick you, but he’s going to want some real information,” Manuck said. “He asked me how I started the business and I had prepared for that mentally, so I told him that I started off as an engineer working for a big company and just decided that I could do it better.” The President eventually referenced this response in the remarks he gave at the end of his visit.

Additionally, Manuck did research beforehand to dig up some information about his company that he thought the president might find interesting. “I dug up our employment stats and from Dec. 2008 to Dec. 2014, our employment had grown 33%, but that included an acquisition. If you exclude that it was still up 20%.” The President asked what kind of hires Manuck had made, whether they were college grads, two-year college grads or other. “All of the above,” he said, delving further into details about his workforce and hiring philosophy. “Out of high school, they’re not ready. It’s not only the math and the writing, it’s the soft skills, which is what I’ve found to be the biggest problem,” Manuck added. The President agreed with him.TechmerWebObamaManuckBiden

It’s not every day that the president and vice president come to visit a factory, but Techmer clearly made the most of it, from their organizational flexibility and teamwork to Manuck’s preparation. “For us the obvious benefit is the positive publicity that we’ve gotten globally,” Manuck said. “People are still buzzing about it.” A great deal of time and work went in to the successful visit, obviously, but for Techmer and other manufacturers who open their doors for elected officials, and everyone else to see, the process of doing is its own benefit. “Some people have asked ‘was it worthwhile?’” Manuck said. “For us it’s a no brainer.”

Tips from the Presidential Visit to Techmer:

  • Make Connections: Had Techmer not made friends with a nearby government lab more than two years ago, and worked openly and productively with them in whatever way they could, the Presidential visit would never have happened.
  • Be Flexible: Techmer shut down its plant and rearranged its operational schedule in order to meet its visitors’ needs and make up for any downtime.
  • Be Prepared: It might seem obvious, but when you’re hosting an elected official or policymaker, don’t miss your opportunity to leave an impression.
  • Say Yes: Manuck said that the Secret Service repeatedly remarked on how accommodating his team was, which apparently isn’t always the case. “Whether it’s corporate red tape or whatever, companies will just say no to stuff,” Manuck said. “For us, the attitude of my people and I was that if the White House is coming here and they want something, we’re going to provide it.”

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Wittmann Battenfeld Opens Doors to Educate Next Generation of Plastics Workers

At the heart of events like Manufacturing Day is the concept that if skilled trades are being taught in the nation’s classrooms less and less, then manufacturers themselves must pick up the slack. Opening the doors of their factories to welcome communities, educators and students allows them to educate potential future employees and demonstrate the true value of their work as well as the cutting-edge technology and processes that make manufacturing stick in the mind of the next generation of workers as a career of the future rather than a career of the past.

This year’s Manufacturing Day was a great success, and next year’s event will be too, but companies need not wait all the way until October to open their doors ever year. Welcoming the younger generation into your facilities is a good idea at any time throughout the year, and, when done diligently, can leave a lasting impact on communities, educators and the future employees of the company itself.

Wittman Battenfeld President David Preusse addresses attendees at the company's Open House and Future Careers Event.

Wittmann Battenfeld President David Preusse addresses attendees at the company’s Open House and Future Careers Event.

Wittmann Battenfeld, Inc. became the latest SPI member to do just that, opening the doors of their headquarters in Torrington, Connecticut. to the public earlier this month. Wittmann President David Preusse said that while they expected the event to draw between 60 and 80 attendees, it ended up drawing over 200. That’s because the Open House and Future Careers Event hosted at Wittmann was something of a master class on how companies can successfully plan and execute gatherings such as these at their own facilities. Welcoming in members of the community in a way that’s as beneficial to the company’s future as it is to the attendees doesn’t happen overnight, and it doesn’t happen without employee wide commitment and planning. Wittmann Battenfeld’s event had all of these elements, and ended up being a rousing success because of it.

Attendees, who ranged from middle-school children up through college students, parents, professors and teachers, were all split into groups and each progressed around the factory, visiting nine different stations manned by a Wittmann employee. Guests heard from Preusse, about the background of the company, as well as some information about Wittmann Battenfeld’s products and plastics manufacturing process in general, and various other employees discussed their segments of the company, their careers and the opportunities that exist to work in robotics and plastics technology. They gave demonstrations of Wittman’s machinery in action, and some even let some of the younger attendees try out some parts of the plant’s robot controls.

The employees involved with the event were mostly on the technical side, but Preusse noted that they spoke frequently about the various career opportunities available strictly within Wittmann’s corporate structure. “There are 35 different jobs that people who work for our company have, including sales and accounting and all kinds of other jobs,” he said. “People went to the different stations and learned how we program our robots, micro-molding and material handling, and each person that they came to see introduced themselves and said a bit about their history with the company,” Preusse noted, adding that many Wittmann employees have started in one function and often moved around within the company, which only increased the opportunities available to potential future employees that were in the audience that day.

“You can move around in a company like ours, and they might not have known that,” Preusse said. “We were trying to give them a sense of something they weren’t aware of.”

Open House attendees at one of the nine different stations Wittman Battenfeld set up for them to visit.

Open House attendees at one of the nine different stations Wittmann Battenfeld set up for them to visit.

This is where a great deal of the value of events like Wittmann’s comes from; there are so many things that the younger generation doesn’t know about plastics and doesn’t know about careers in plastics and in manufacturing. Open houses invite them to learn something that they otherwise wouldn’t have about a field that’s growing, innovative and, frankly, pretty cool. The flyer Wittmann used to promote the event played up the last aspect, featuring a dynamic image of a Wittmann-branded robot inviting people to register and learn more about the robotics and automated aspects of the company’s facility. “It’s hard to say we’re having a career fair for material handling and auxiliary products in the plastics industry,” Preusse said, noting that most attendees wouldn’t be excited by technical jargon and industry-specific terms, which is why the flyer focused on robots and plastics instead.

There’s also a public service aspect inherent to events like these as well, Preusse noted. “Some high school are training and schooling [in fields like robotics and engineering] but some of the kids are going to college and finding it difficult to find jobs because they didn’t really get a chance to learn about the allure or the complexity of the plastics manufacturing industry,” he said. “It’s unfortunate that they’re just not really exposed to any of that.”

As beneficial and forward-thinking as it is for a company to host events like these in order to excite a new generation of plastics workers and advocates, in many ways it’s also a generous way to get people thinking about options that they didn’t know were available to them. “The idea was that we wanted to give back to the community,” Preusse said. “People of all ages have the chance to really get a great career out of plastics working for very successful companies with great benefits. We wanted to show them some pretty cool stuff that’s happening in the plastics industry, and host an event so that they could learn about a really cool factory right here in the countryside of Connecticut.”

Tips for Making Your Company’s Open House a Success

  • Divide and Conquer – Dividing things into different stations and functions will help keep the program itself lively and engaging. Getting your employees involved in the process will leave a bigger impact on attendees as they share their own stories and passion for their work.
  • Know Your Audience – It’s important to remember that industry terms that are common on the factory floor are largely unheard of beyond a facility’s walls. Using more relatable, understandable terms in any marketing materials and event announcements will appeal to more attendees. Also if you have a target age group in mind be sure to tailor the message in those materials to the attendees you’re hoping to welcome, like the way Wittmann’s promotional flyer focused on robots to draw in younger folks.
  • Have Additional Resources – Preusse noted that they interviewed some Wittmann employees about their plastics career histories and what they enjoyed most about working in the industry and for their company. These are posted on Wittmann’s website on the jobs page, so that attendees can read more of the stories from the employees they met as they toured the facility, increasing the event’s overall impact.

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

War College in a Plastic World

By Kim Coghill, SPI Communications Director

While the concept of leading in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous (VUCA) world has its roots in the U.S. military, the business community has borrowed the successful approach to strategic leadership and applied it to management training across industries.

“In reality, VUCA has never been more relevant, for the military and for business,” Gen. George W. Casey Jr. (Ret.), said in a Fortune magazine article that addresses parallels between his leadership challenges in Bosnia, Kosovo and Iraq, and the current business environment.

Recognizing the value of VUCA leadership training, organizers of the 2014 Equipment & Moldmakers Leadership Summit in October have scheduled a half-day Executive Workshop designed to apply VUCA principles to plastics manufacturing management. The program, “Leading in a VUCA World,” will be taught by international business experts from the world renowned Thunderbird School of Global Management.

“Regardless of an organization’s size and footprint, the workshop is designed to equip attendees with strategies to overcome the challenges and seize the opportunities presented in a global industry,” said Jackie Dalzell, SPI’s director of industry affairs and staff leader for the Equipment & Moldmakers Council.

Leadership thinkers have been turning to lessons learned from the military to create paradigms for surviving and thriving in a turbulent, “permanent whitewater” world where old styles of managing predictability were falling short, Thunderbird professors Paul Kinsinger and Karen Walch said in an article titled, “Living and Leading in a VUCA World.”

Kinsinger and Walch said research shows that the keys to leading in a VUCA world include possessing the knowledge, mindfulness and ability to:

  1. Create a vision and “make sense of the world.” Sense-making is perhaps more important now than at any time in modern history for many companies, as we are not too many years away from the time when the global economy will actually be truly “global,” encompassing every country and in which competitors will be emanating from everywhere.
  2. Understand one’s own and others’ values and intentions. This speaks to having a core ability to know what you want to be and where you want to go at all times, even while being open to multiple ways to get there.
  3. Seek clarity regarding yourself and seek sustainable relationships and solutions. Leading in turbulence demands the ability to utilize all facets of the human mind. Even the most impressive cognitive minds will fall short in the VUCA world — it will take equal parts cognitive, social, emotional, spiritual, and physical intelligence to prevail.
  4. Practice agility, adaptability and buoyancy. This means the responsive and resilient ability to balance adroitly and right yourself to ride out those turbulent forces that cannot be avoided, and to pivot quickly to seize advantage of those that can be harnessed.
  5. Develop and engage social networks. The ability to recognize that the days of the single “great leader” are gone. In the VUCA world, the best leaders are the ones who harness leadership from everyone.

The Executive Workshop scheduled for the Summit is based on strategies developed by the U.S. Army College at the end of the Cold War to address threats that created a VUCA world.  Attendees will learn fundamental principles of a VUCA “antidote” combined with specific strategies resulting from in-depth research on trends impacting the plastics industry. The SPI 2014 Equipment & Moldmakers Leadership Summit is scheduled Sunday, Oct. 26 through Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014, at Loew’s Ventana Canyon in Tucson, Ariz.

Other highlights of the Summit include a Brand Owner Panel discussing technology needs to support their product innovations, what equipment manufacturers and moldmakers need to know about new and reformulated materials, update on the U.S. manufacturing renaissance and re-shoring initiatives, and much more.  Register today by clicking here, seats are filling up fast!  We look forward to seeing you in Tucson.

 

 

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Polymers Snap in Response to Light, No Other Power needed

A recently published research paper from the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering and the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base describes plastics that can “snap” when triggered by light. The light energy is converted into mechanical action with no need for traditional machine components such as switches and power sources.

“I like to compare this action to that of a Venus Fly Trap,” says M. Ravi Shankar, associate professor of engineering at Pitt, whose research focuses on innovative nanomaterials. “The underlying mechanism that allows the Venus Fly Trap to capture prey is slow. But because its internal structure is coupled to use elastic instability, a snapping action occurs, and this delivers the power to shut the trap quickly.

Shankar, collaborating with Timothy J. White of the Air Force Research Laboratory and Matthew Smith, assistant professor of engineering at Hope College (Holland, MI), focused on the elastic instability of azobenzene-functionalized polymers (both amorphous polyamides and liquid crystal polymers) prepared by the Air Force lab, which showed unprecedented actuation rates and output powers. With light from a hand-held laser pointer, the polymers generated high amounts of power that converted the light into mechanical work without any other power source.

A polymer deforms when irradiated with light (blue) and snaps, delivering a large amount of power at millisecond time scales. (Image: M. Ravi Shankar et al, University of Pittsburgh)

A polymer irradiated with light (blue)  snaps, delivering a large amount of power at millisecond time scales. (Image: M. Ravi Shankar et al, University of Pittsburgh)

“As we look to real-world applications, you could activate a switch simply by shining light on it,” Shankar said. “For example, you could develop soft machines such as stents or other biomedical devices that can be more adaptive and easily controlled. In a more complex mechanism, we could imagine a light-driven robotic or morphing structure, or micro-vehicles that would be more compact because you eliminate the need for an on-board power system. The work potential is built into the polymer itself and is triggered with light.”

Scientists have known for years about a class of photo-responsive polymers that would react to light with no other power source. Problem was, their movement was very slow. The research team shaped the polymer into a geometry resembling a hummingbird’s beak or the trap of a Venus Fly Trap plant. When irradiated with light, the polymer initially deforms slowly, but when it reaches a critical state, it snaps. Shankar told KurzweilAI they generated actuation in millisecond time-scales and power approaching kilowatts per cubic meter at radiation intensities far less than 100 milliwatts per square centimeter and potentially over long distances.

Shankar, White and Smith published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in early November. Shankar’s research was enabled through an eight-week Air Force Office of Scientific Research Summer Faculty Fellowship.

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

High-Tech Plastic Fibers Take On Increasingly Tougher Jobs

The Economist magazine’s Technology Quarterly reports on leading-edge tech from every sector, and the latest issue once again has turned to the plastics industry for its newest and coolest. The editors did not, however, focus on obvious targets such as plastics in airplane or car bodies, micro components or another breakthrough medical device.

As the article “Material benefits” states: “…researchers around the world are now cooking up myriad new textiles capable of containing explosions, protecting astronauts, thwarting bacteria and even keeping buildings standing during earthquakes.” Textiles? Really? Yes, new fabrics and threads, small and even delicate as they may seem, are coming out of the labs to solve big — often very big — problems in a variety of sectors.

Air cargo nets of UHMWPE plastic are much stronger to stop loads breaking loose.

Newer air cargo nets of UHMWPE plastic are much stronger to keep loads in place. (Image: AmSafe Bridport)

For example, when a cargo net securing freight in an airplane breaks during takeoff, the load can shift backwards and  raise the plane’s nose enough to cause a stall. All too often the result has been a fatal crash. As a result, several major airlines recently have begun using cargo netting woven from fibers of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a plastic material much stronger than the polyester netting that has been widely used.

The strength-to-weight ratio of UHMWPE fibers is about 15 times that of steel, according to AmSafe Bridport, a British producer of cargo nets made of Dyneema UHMWPE fibers from the Netherlands-based Royal DSM Group. Though the new nets cost about four times more than the traditional nets, the they last longer and weigh about half as much, and that saves fuel, which reduces CO2 emissions. They also are easier to handle.

For this bridge in Houston, TX, Vectran LCP fiber was the lighter and stronger choice over steel cable.

For this bridge in Houston, TX, Vectran LCP fiber was a lighter, stronger choice than steel cable. (Image: Kuraray)

The Economist also describes how the Japanese firm Kuraray Group found a way to pump liquid crystal polymer (LCP) through holes 23 microns (millionths of a meter) in diameter to create fibers that are very thin yet incredibly strong. How strong? You can twist about 100,000 of them together to form a cord a bit thicker than a pencil, with which you can suspend about eight tons. Picture four SUVs hanging by that pencil-thin cord.

Branded Vectran, the material also has excellent resistance to stretching. So along with being excellent for applications such as tape and sails, the material can be used for cabling in robots to help keep their gestures precise. On a larger scale, Vectran cabling was used to retrofita pedestrian bridge over interstate highway 610 in Houston, TX — the lightweight, high-strength alternative to steel. The material also performed well in outer space.

NASA’s Pathfinder, Spirit and Opportunity missions successfully landed their Rover vehicles with the aid of airbags made with Vectran LCP fiber. But the larger size of the Mars Curiosity Rover required a new and much more complex landing system.

The LCP cords in this bridle assembly helped lower the Curiosity  Rover onto the surface of Mars. (Image Courtesy of NASA)

The LCP cords in this bridle assembly helped lower the Curiosity Rover onto the surface of Mars—gently. (Image: NASA)

The Curiosity Rover began its descent from a bit more than a mile above Mars inside an aeroshell traveling about 220 mph. It emerged tethered to a Sky Crane rocket thruster platform that slowed and positioned Curiosity near the surface. Three bridle systems and tethers containing Vectran LCP fiber lowered the Rover 25 feet to a soft landing. (The process is shown in a graphic below.)

The Economist went on to mention several other polymeric textiles used for such non-routine tasks as protecting armored vehicles and keeping buildings from collapsing in earthquakes. However, it did not mention the Dyneema-UHMWPE-fiber cables that held the capsized cruise ship Costa Concordia so it did not slide off its resting place while it was rotated upright last month in a complex 19-hour operation near the Italian island of Giglio. That merits a mention because the ship is more than three football fields long and weighs almost 115,000 tons. Those slender plastic fibers are strong indeed.

 How the One-Ton Curiosity Rover Made a Soft Landing on Planet Mars

Three bridle assemblies used LCP fibers in the last stage of gently lowering the Curiosity Rover onto the surface of Mars.

Three bridle assemblies in the Sky Crane used LCP fibers during the last stage of gently lowering the nearly-one-ton Curiosity Rover onto the surface of Mars. (Image: NASA)

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