Friday, September 23rd, 2016

The FLiP Files: Jennifer Cioffi

The FLiP Files is a blog series spotlighting young professionals that are active in SPI’s Future Leaders in Plastics (FLiP), a group for plastics professionals under the age of 40.  For our next FLiP File, we spoke to FLiP member Jennifer Cioffi of Jarden Home Brands.

jen1

-Where do you work and what’s your title? I’m the product compliance manager for Jarden Home Brands, a subsidiary of Newell Brands.

-Tell us a little about what your company does.

Newell Brands is a global consumer goods company with a portfolio of well-known brands, including Paper Mate®, Sha​rpie®, Coleman®, Oster®, Sunbeam®, Graco®, Calphalon®, Rubbermaid®, Goody® and Yankee Candle® to name a few!

-How did you find yourself working in the plastics industry?

When I graduated college, I was offered an opportunity to work in business development for a global consulting firm. My first exposure to plastics was working with companies that were seeking regulatory support in complying with global plastics regulations. I immediately knew that my passion was in ensuring that companies manufactured safe and compliant products.

-Has anyone in the industry mentored you? Absolutely—I’ve been fortunate to learn from a number of individuals in the additives and plastics industries. The best part has been learning about the history of plastics and how technology and the manufacturing of plastics have progressed over the last 50 years.

-Describe in one sentence what you do on an average day. A typical day for me consists of conducting regulatory evaluations of our products and developing compliance strategies, test protocols and certifications to ensure that our products meet all applicable regulatory requirements.

-What do you like most about working in the plastics industry? Definitely the innovation! Plastics are used in everything from food packaging to surgical devices. The versatility of plastics is something that amazes me and keeps me passionate about working in the industry.

-What’s one thing about your personal life that you feel has been changed by having a career in plastics? Plastics has become a common conversation topic in my household! Whether we’re taking about migration, safe-use, or recyclability, I enjoy educating family and friends about plastics.

-What are the major challenges you think are facing the plastics industry today? How do you think the industry can overcome them? One of the biggest challenges has to be mitigating the negative public perception of plastics. Many times a random blog post will go up which causes consumers to panic about the safety of plastics. The industry can overcome these challenges by continuing to educate consumers and by working with agencies to support the development of industry and consumer education.

-Why do you think someone from your generation should consider a career in plastics? Plastics are here for the long haul! When it comes to plastics, you’re always learning! There are so many career paths in plastics, whether it be in compliance, manufacturing, medical applications or active/intelligent packaging, the opportunities are endless!

-What’s one plastic product you couldn’t live without? My coffeemaker!

Friday, August 5th, 2016

Sustainability in the Olympics: Striving to Set a Gold Standard

Rio de Janeiro, Sugarloaf Mountain by Sunset

Every four years, millions around the world turn their attention to the Olympic Games and watch athletes bike, flip, swim and run to represent their respective countries in the global competition. While spectators and athletes alike have their eyes set on bringing home the gold, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has set its own goal to minimize its environmental impact. Over the years, the Olympic Games have provided a global stage for brands and corporations to launch innovative, sustainable projects. Check out this timeline below.

1994

The IOC adopted “Environment” as a principle of Olympism. This new principle signified the start of a unified effort to make greener plans for the world’s largest sporting event.

2000

During the Sydney games, eco-friendly athletic attire had its Olympic debut when two runners crossed the finish line sporting Nike’s first recycled PET clothing.

2004

The Olympic Games returned “home” to Athens for the first time since 1896. Planners installed special disposal bins for plastic bottles to help manage the environmental pressure that comes with hosting an event attended by millions.

2008

In the Beijing games, Nike’s PET athletic line returned to the spotlight when track and field athletes from 17 different countries sported the uniforms. Coca-Cola joined the team and gave every Olympic athlete a t-shirt created with PET from five recycled water bottles. The shorts sported the slogan “I am from Earth” on the front to signify the unified effort to preserve the environment.

Sprinter getting ready to start the race

2012

Basketball teams from Brazil, China and USA competed for the top spot in Nike shorts and uniforms made from 100 percent recycled polyester, respectively, which saved an average of 22 bottles per uniform. In addition, American sprinters wore tracksuits that were each made of material from 13 recycled water bottles.

2016

At this year’s Rio de Janeiro Olympics, Brazil highlighted its host country pride by installing a sculpture of the Olympic rings in Copacabana. The installation, which is 3 meters tall and 6 meters wide, was created using 65 kilograms of recycled plastic.  In addition, the medals will be held around athletes’ necks by ribbons composed of recycled plastic bottles.

  Olympic gold medal

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Plastics Industry Welcomes First Bipartisan TSCA Update in 40 Years

BillC 2015 NEW USE THIS

SPI President and CEO William Carteaux

Earlier this week the Senate approved a much-needed update to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The bill is now headed to President Barack Obama’s desk for signature. Here’s what SPI President and CEO William Carteaux, had to say about the first substantive update to TSCA in four decades:

“The U.S. plastics industry and its partners have worked tirelessly with multiple Congresses and administrations to make our nation’s outdated chemical regulatory infrastructure stronger and more responsive to the needs of today’s consumers and companies.

Today those efforts have paid off in the form of bipartisan legislation marking the first substantive update to the Toxic Substances Control Act in four decades.

CongressSunriseViewThis consensus-based bill is the product of thoughtful discussions by House and Senate negotiators.  It gives consumers the confidence in the products they depend upon each day, while giving companies a more predictable regulatory system that’s based on science rather than rhetoric.  The plastics industry also applauds lawmakers for ensuring that the new bill provides for the preservation of confidential business information, ensuring that the growth this bill is certain to unlock won’t be jeopardized.

This is a great day for the U.S. plastics industry and its nearly one million workers and their families. We look forward to continuing to grow the American economy by manufacturing the safest, strongest and most technologically advanced products and materials.”

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Bridging the Gap between Policymakers and Business Owners

Every year, members of the plastics industry have the opportunity to fly to Washington, D.C. to meet directly with members of Congress and voice their opinions on policies that directly affect their line of business. The Plastics Industry Fly-In is a way to bridge the gap between policymakers and business owners. Members of Congress and their staffs deal with a number of issues and when they are able to put a face and story to a policy, it helps them make better informed decisions. Below are comments on the importance of the Fly-In from some industry members who have participated in past Fly-Ins:

TedFisher_headshot

Ted Fisher, Sales Director, ALAC International, Inc.: “I attended my first Fly-In in 2010, and haven’t missed one since.

The initial exposure to the inner, inside-office and inner workings on Capitol Hill was significant. I went from a deer in the headlights to being fairly comfortable very quickly, but you have to take that first step. Going up there with your colleagues and having things laid out for you, like they are at the Fly-In, certainly gets you up to speed pretty quickly.

When you’re face-to-face with the staffers, senators and the congressmen themselves, that’s your opportunity to convey what’s important to your organization, and you can’t do that remotely. You’ve got to be in front of them to make an impact.”

 

Wylie Royce

Wylie Royce, Partner, Royce Associates: “Too many people in our industry think that because they may not come from a large company, going to D.C. is a waste of time. There is also an assumption that the big company lobbyists will take care of the industry issues for them, and that is simply not the case. Lobbyists take care of what they are paid to take care of, and if it coincides with your interests that’s good; if it doesn’t, then you are letting someone who has no interest in your future make your business decisions for you.

After one or two visits to D.C. to attend the Fly-In you may think, ‘Why should I bother? Nothing seems to be getting done.’ What’s getting done is you are building a relationship with the legislators who can directly affect your business, and this relationship isn’t built overnight. Instead, it requires several visits and follow-up calls. By building this relationship, you are becoming a credible source of information to your legislators and their staff, and you will have a voice in decisions that they make. In some cases, that could mean the difference between continuing and dropping a complete line of products.”

Greg Leighton with Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-CA) at C&G Mercury Plastics.

Greg Leighton with Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-CA) at C&G Mercury Plastics.

Greg Leighton, Owner, C&G Mercury Plastics: “The benefits of the Fly-In are that I get to see my legislators personally. When I talk to them on the phone they recognize me. I When I invite them for a plant tour, they come.

I went to Congressman Tony Cardenas’ office at a Fly-In a couple of years ago. A few years after, we invited him to visit our plant, and he came. He brought his chief of staff, toured the plant and was impressed by what we were doing.

The Fly-In also shows the next generation that you don’t have to be nervous to do this. There’s all this angst out there for the next generation: ‘What’s the future going to look like?’ You need to show that you can participate in that future.”

Participating in the Fly-In is a key step in creating long-term relationships with legislators and policymakers that can benefit your company for years to come. This year, the Fly-In will be held June 21-22 on Capitol Hill. To register, click here.

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

Why TSCA Reform Benefits Both the Public and the Plastics Industry

US CapitolThere’s much praise for both the House and Senate versions of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) legislation. Why? How does reforming a 40-year old piece of legislation impact an additive supplier in the value chain for an intricate piece in a larger finished product? Why should consumers be optimistic about the safety of future household products?

TSCA reform that is being negotiated by representatives from each chamber of Congress will update the 40-year-old regulatory framework to reflect today’s chemical manufacturing environment. In particular, we expect the negotiated version to overhaul the safety standards for chemicals entering the market, codify federal preemption language, and to protect confidential business information.

Here’s a look at what SPI and its members/stakeholders support:

Updated Safety Standards

TSCA will better define the safety standards that chemical manufacturers must meet so that consumers are more confident about the safety of chemicals in commerce. Costs and other non-risk factors should not be considered when evaluating the safety of a chemical. It is important TSCA consider potentially exposed subpopulations, such as children, to a chemical even under the intended conditions of use. Without these changes, it is difficult for businesses to demonstrate the safety of their products under the current, outdated regulatory system.

Federal Regulation to Preempt State Regulations

TSCA reform will reduce the need some states feel to step into the realm of chemical regulation. It’s more efficient for a company to comply with one federal regulation than it is to juggle 50 individual state regulations. The federal government recognizes this and is defining a threshold for states to implement their own regulatory standards.

Protect Confidential Business Information

Today’s TSCA reform outlines when information needs to be provided by private companies, but it also clarifies what is and is not protected. This confidence allows businesses to move forward with more innovative solutions to today’s chemical needs without worrying about disclosing trade secrets in the regulatory process.

U.S. manufacturers have made great strides in advancing chemical technology and use. These innovations make life as we know it possible. Unfortunately, the regulatory environment has not kept pace – but we expect this to change when negotiations conclude and a final bill is signed into law. We are confident that promising days lie ahead for those in the plastics industry impacted by TSCA.