Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Plastics Industry Welcomes First Bipartisan TSCA Update in 40 Years

BillC 2015 NEW USE THIS

SPI President and CEO William Carteaux

Earlier this week the Senate approved a much-needed update to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The bill is now headed to President Barack Obama’s desk for signature. Here’s what SPI President and CEO William Carteaux, had to say about the first substantive update to TSCA in four decades:

“The U.S. plastics industry and its partners have worked tirelessly with multiple Congresses and administrations to make our nation’s outdated chemical regulatory infrastructure stronger and more responsive to the needs of today’s consumers and companies.

Today those efforts have paid off in the form of bipartisan legislation marking the first substantive update to the Toxic Substances Control Act in four decades.

CongressSunriseViewThis consensus-based bill is the product of thoughtful discussions by House and Senate negotiators.  It gives consumers the confidence in the products they depend upon each day, while giving companies a more predictable regulatory system that’s based on science rather than rhetoric.  The plastics industry also applauds lawmakers for ensuring that the new bill provides for the preservation of confidential business information, ensuring that the growth this bill is certain to unlock won’t be jeopardized.

This is a great day for the U.S. plastics industry and its nearly one million workers and their families. We look forward to continuing to grow the American economy by manufacturing the safest, strongest and most technologically advanced products and materials.”

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Bridging the Gap between Policymakers and Business Owners

Every year, members of the plastics industry have the opportunity to fly to Washington, D.C. to meet directly with members of Congress and voice their opinions on policies that directly affect their line of business. The Plastics Industry Fly-In is a way to bridge the gap between policymakers and business owners. Members of Congress and their staffs deal with a number of issues and when they are able to put a face and story to a policy, it helps them make better informed decisions. Below are comments on the importance of the Fly-In from some industry members who have participated in past Fly-Ins:

TedFisher_headshot

Ted Fisher, Sales Director, ALAC International, Inc.: “I attended my first Fly-In in 2010, and haven’t missed one since.

The initial exposure to the inner, inside-office and inner workings on Capitol Hill was significant. I went from a deer in the headlights to being fairly comfortable very quickly, but you have to take that first step. Going up there with your colleagues and having things laid out for you, like they are at the Fly-In, certainly gets you up to speed pretty quickly.

When you’re face-to-face with the staffers, senators and the congressmen themselves, that’s your opportunity to convey what’s important to your organization, and you can’t do that remotely. You’ve got to be in front of them to make an impact.”

 

Wylie Royce

Wylie Royce, Partner, Royce Associates: “Too many people in our industry think that because they may not come from a large company, going to D.C. is a waste of time. There is also an assumption that the big company lobbyists will take care of the industry issues for them, and that is simply not the case. Lobbyists take care of what they are paid to take care of, and if it coincides with your interests that’s good; if it doesn’t, then you are letting someone who has no interest in your future make your business decisions for you.

After one or two visits to D.C. to attend the Fly-In you may think, ‘Why should I bother? Nothing seems to be getting done.’ What’s getting done is you are building a relationship with the legislators who can directly affect your business, and this relationship isn’t built overnight. Instead, it requires several visits and follow-up calls. By building this relationship, you are becoming a credible source of information to your legislators and their staff, and you will have a voice in decisions that they make. In some cases, that could mean the difference between continuing and dropping a complete line of products.”

Greg Leighton with Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-CA) at C&G Mercury Plastics.

Greg Leighton with Rep. Tony Cárdenas (D-CA) at C&G Mercury Plastics.

Greg Leighton, Owner, C&G Mercury Plastics: “The benefits of the Fly-In are that I get to see my legislators personally. When I talk to them on the phone they recognize me. I When I invite them for a plant tour, they come.

I went to Congressman Tony Cardenas’ office at a Fly-In a couple of years ago. A few years after, we invited him to visit our plant, and he came. He brought his chief of staff, toured the plant and was impressed by what we were doing.

The Fly-In also shows the next generation that you don’t have to be nervous to do this. There’s all this angst out there for the next generation: ‘What’s the future going to look like?’ You need to show that you can participate in that future.”

Participating in the Fly-In is a key step in creating long-term relationships with legislators and policymakers that can benefit your company for years to come. This year, the Fly-In will be held June 21-22 on Capitol Hill. To register, click here.

Wednesday, May 25th, 2016

The U.S. Plastics Industry’s Top Five Export Markets

Of the U.S. plastics industry’s $427 billion in annual sales, slightly more than 20 percent of that comes from exports, according to SPI’s 2015 Global Trends Report. The lion’s share of that goes to these top five export markets for the U.S. plastics industry as of 2015.

Sunday´s bikers in Paseo de la Reforma, Mexico

1) Mexico

No surprise that the first entry on this list is America’s closest neighbor and strongest trading partner.  The U.S. exported $15.8 billion in goods to Mexico in 2014. Mexico’s plastics industry relies greatly on its U.S. partners, particularly when it comes to resin, where the U.S. has a $6.7 billion surplus with Mexico.

Toronto skyline

2) Canada

The U.S. plastics industry exported $13.2 billion worth of products to its northern neighbor in 2014. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) drives a great deal of America’s beneficial trade relationships with both Canada and Mexico, but this relationship goes both ways. Most U.S. polyethylene imports come from Canada, a country with rich hydrocarbon resources that can be converted into chemicals and resins.

Beijing, China CBD Cityscape

3) China

The world’s largest resin consumer is America’s third-largest export market, where U.S. companies had a $2.8 billion surplus in 2014 (as opposed to a $9.2 billion deficit for the industry as a whole).

Rio

4) Brazil

Brazil relies heavily on U.S. products from throughout the plastics supply chain, with the U.S. running trade surpluses with the country in all four plastics categories (resin, plastic products, molds and plastics machinery).

Yokohama

5) Japan

Japan could overtake Brazil to become the fourth-largest export market for U.S. companies (if it hasn’t already since the time of this writing) but regardless, it remains an important trade partner for the U.S. and ships a great deal of machinery put to use at U.S. companies.

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Plastic Packaging and the Ability to Feed People

FoodPackaging_StockPhotoOne of the simplest reasons packaging is poised to become a nearly $1 trillion industry in the next decade is because it contains, protects and preserves food and water. With as much food and water as we consume, the prevalence of food waste, and packaging’s role in eliminating it, was a prominent theme at this year’s Flexible Film & Bag Conference, which wrapped up in Houston, Texas last week.

The plastic films and flexible plastic packaging that covers meat, poultry, cheese, vegetables and other edible goods prolong the life of the products they contain by shielding them from bacteria, heat, cold and moisture, among other things. Attendees representing the companies that manufacture some of these items discussed ways to make their products more efficient and effective in combating lost and wasted food, a global issue that’s reached critical levels in environmental, economic and humanitarian terms.

Chopin at the 2016 Flexible Film & Bag Conference

Chopin at the 2016 Flexible Film & Bag Conference

“Food waste is an incredible problem,” said presenter Lamy Chopin of Dow Chemical. “If you consider the ripple effect of losing valuable food, the farmers that have invested in the land…any of that product that doesn’t get consumed has a significant greenhouse footprint.” The financial impact of food waste, according to Chopin, is up to $300 billion lost annually.

Environmentally, the impact of food waste is at least ten times larger than the environmental impact of packaging, and part of what makes that the case is plastic’s unique material and manufacturing properties. “One of the reasons why plastics are winning in the space of packaging in particular is they’re incredibly efficient,” Chopin noted. “They win out in terms of energy use and impact” when compared to other packaging materials, he added.

The epidemic of food waste and the ramifications it has for society are a huge priority for agencies, NGOs and governments around the globe. Plastic materials, particularly plastic films, will have an important role to play in combating these issues, and doing so as sustainably and efficiently as possible.

Monday, May 16th, 2016

Keeping America Beautiful with #SPIEarthDay

recyclingEach Earth Day, we celebrate preserving our planet and put in some extra effort to clean up our communities. Now more than ever, those within the plastics industry understand the commitment to sustainable practices and programs that will help to protect the world we live in for generations to come.

Here at SPI, we celebrated Earth Day for the entire month of April, coinciding with our first-ever Re|focus Summit & Expo which included prominent speakers from the plastics, recycling, food, beverage and consumer products industries who gathered to take their environmental goals from aspirational to operational. We also launched an Earth Day Pledge Challenge, where we encouraged members of the plastics industry to pledge to perform at least one act of green, or actions that reduce our environmental footprint.

Participants representing regions ranging from North America to the Middle East, and the diversity of plastics professionals, committed to implementing small, yet impactful acts of green in their daily lives Survey participants pledged acts of green which included committing to recycling more, participating in local clean-ups, reducing food waste and much more.

KAB logoRewarding our industry’s commitment, SPI agreed to randomly select an individual who completed the survey, and also shared their act of green commitments using the hashtag #SPIEarthDay, to donate $1,500 to a local Keep America Beautiful (KAB) affiliate of his or her choice. Sandeep Kulkarni, senior principal scientist at PepsiCo Global R&D, was randomly selected among the participants. Sandeep has will select a local KAB affiliate as his choice to receive SPI’s donation of $1,500.