Monday, September 17th, 2012

New York City Limits Drink Sizes — Also Jobs

Jobs, jobs, and jobs: That’s all we hear, and it makes sense. We need a bunch more jobs than we have. Unless you’re in New York City, that is.

Manhattan Skyline

t city, displays some very small thinking.

On September 13, 2012, the New York City Board of Health put hundreds of American manufacturing jobs at risk when it approved a ban on the sale of large sodas and other drinks at restaurants, street carts, and movie theaters, the first regulation of its kind in the country. Championed by the city’s mayor, Michael R. Bloomberg, the restriction is aimed at America’s rising obesity rates, and is scheduled to take effect on March 12, 2013, unless it is blocked prior to that date.

Members of SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association include the many American companies, mostly small- and medium-sized enterprises, that make up the supply chain for plastic products made in the USA. That includes those making plastic bottles and cups of every size and type.

SPI opposes this proposed ban for good reasons, both economic and societal. We all are well aware of the obesity problem across America, but whether or not the Big Apple’s ban on large, sweet beverages is a solution is questionable. What’s clear is that the regulation itself is problematic.

SPI member companies in the New York City region that make plastic bottles and drinking cups are almost certain to be negatively impacted by this regulation, as are many other people in the region. According to statistics released by the New York State Department of Labor on August 16th, New York has regained all the private sector jobs it lost in the recession, while the country as a whole has regained only 44%. Maybe New York City is feeling bulletproof about jobs. It shouldn’t.

SPI’s latest “Size and Impact of the Plastics Industry on the U.S. Economy” report shows that in New York State during 2011 there were 18 facilities manufacturing plastic bottles. They employed more than 900 people total, but even that is not the full picture. In the tri-state region of New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, generally known as the greater NYC metro area, there are 35 plastic bottle manufacturing facilities. They employ more than 2,500 people, many of them the main support of a family. Jobs will be at risk from this quirky ban.

The value of products shipped by those 35 bottle manufacturing plants was $826 million in 2011. Their total payroll for the year was $112 million, and it is well established that every manufacturing job supports a minimum of three other jobs, and often more.

SPI also opposes this level of intrusive government regulation in the lives of American citizens. This nit-picky social engineering goes contrary to American ideals—freedom for example. And seriously, aren’t there at least a couple dozen more urgent problems that governments should be working on?

And if this regulation is implemented, then what? At a minimum, we probably can expect the number of ounces to be further reduced later, after little or no reduction in obesity is seen. But will the city government then move on to dictate portion sizes served in restaurants, or how many of a

particular item you can buy at one time in a supermarket?

Shortly after the Board of Health’s vote, Mayor Bloomberg was quoted by the New York Times as saying, ‘It’s certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take, and we believe that it will help save lives.’ The first part of the mayor’s statement is what should concern us. How many more ‘steps’ might be taken to regulate individual Americans? Impossible to say, but SPI will continue to support those who oppose this intrusive and short-sighted regulation, especially those taking action to block it.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + B)Italic (Ctrl / Alt+Shift + I)Strikethrough (Alt+Shift+D)Unordered list (Alt+Shift+U)Ordered list (Alt+Shift+O)Blockquote (Alt+Shift+Q)Align Left (Alt+Shift+L)Align Center (Alt+Shift+C)Align Right (Alt+Shift+R)Insert/edit link (Alt+Shift+A)Unlink (Alt+Shift+S)Insert More Tag (Alt+Shift+T)Toggle spellchecker (Alt+Shift+N)▼
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Jobs, jobs, and jobs: That’s all we hear, and it makes sense. We need a bunch more jobs than we have. Unless you’re in New York City, that is.

New York, America’s largest city, displays some very small thinking.On September 13, 2012, the New York City Board of Health put hundreds of American manufacturing jobs at risk when it approved a ban on the sale of large sodas and other drinks at restaurants, street carts, and movie theaters, the first regulation of its kind in the country. Championed by the city’s mayor, Michael R. Bloomberg, the restriction is aimed at America’s rising obesity rates, and is scheduled to take effect on March 12, 2013, unless it is blocked prior to that date.
Members of SPI: The Plastics Industry Trade Association include the many American companies, mostly small- and medium-sized enterprises, that make up the supply chain for plastic products made in the USA. That includes those making plastic bottles and cups of every size and type.
SPI opposes this proposed ban for good reasons, both economic and societal. We all are well aware of the obesity problem across America, but whether or not the Big Apple’s ban on large, sweet beverages is a solution is questionable. What’s clear is that the regulation itself is problematic.
SPI member companies in the New York City region that make plastic bottles and drinking cups are almost certain to be negatively impacted by this regulation, as are many other people in the region. According to statistics released by the New York State Department of Labor on August 16th, New York has regained all the private sector jobs it lost in the recession, while the country as a whole has regained only 44%. Maybe New York City is feeling bulletproof about jobs. It shouldn’t.
SPI’s latest “Size and Impact of the Plastics Industry on the U.S. Economy” report shows that in New York State during 2011 there were 18 facilities manufacturing plastic bottles. They employed more than 900 people total, but even that is not the full picture. In the tri-state region of New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey, generally known as the greater NYC metro area, there are 35 plastic bottle manufacturing facilities. They employ more than 2,500 people, many of them the main support of a family. Jobs will be at risk from this quirky ban.
The value of products shipped by those 35 bottle manufacturing plants was $826 million in 2011. Their total payroll for the year was $112 million, and it is well established that every manufacturing job supports a minimum of three other jobs, and often more.
SPI also opposes this level of intrusive government regulation in the lives of American citizens. This nit-picky social engineering goes contrary to American ideals—freedom for example. And seriously, aren’t there at least a couple dozen more urgent problems that governments should be working on?
And if this regulation is implemented, then what? At a minimum, we probably can expect the number of ounces to be further reduced later, after little or no reduction in obesity is seen. But will the city government then move on to dictate portion sizes served in restaurants, or how many of a particular item you can buy at one time in a supermarket?
Shortly after the Board of Health’s vote, Mayor Bloomberg was quoted by the New York Times as saying, ‘It’s certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take, and we believe that it will help save lives.’ The first part of the mayor’s statement is what should concern us. How many more ‘steps’ might be taken to regulate individual Americans? Impossible to say, but SPI will continue to support those who oppose this intrusive and short-sighted regulation, especially those taking action to block it.
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