Thursday, December 18th, 2014

What the Entire Plastics Industry Can Learn from the APBA

apba logo_2012Many of you probably already know the American Progressive Bag Alliance (APBA) as a protector of the plastics industry – and with good reason. The APBA is on the front lines of plastics advocacy, most recently gathering the roughly 505,000 valid signatures required to qualify a California referendum in opposition to SB 270, the nation’s only statewide ban on plastic bags. If this law went into effect, it obviously would set a dangerous precedent.  That’s why the APBA is working to defeat this and other erroneous pieces of legislation.  They do it often, and they do it well. In fact, signature collection is going even better than expected, and SPI and the APBA are confident that the referendum will be on the ballot in November 2016.

But that’s not all the APBA does. As we’ve highlighted here on In the Hopper and on SPI’s website, again and again (and again), the APBA also encourages innovation and promotes environmental progress.  Those efforts often get overshadowed: that is, the APBA spends so much time educating the public and serving as an example of how to proactively address challenges and capitalize on opportunities that its innovation and outreach messages get lost. But the APBA has a great deal more to offer the plastics industry at large.

abagslifelogo2For instance, you may not be aware that the APBA strongly supports A Bag’s Life, a public education campaign that unites non-profits, community and government organizations to support the common goal of promoting the three R’s—reduce, reuse, recycle. A Bag’s Life hosts many school recycling competitions around the country, including an ongoing initiative in Galveston that runs from America Recycles Day 2014 through Earth Day 2015, and which to date has resulted in the collection of roughly 1 million plastic bags and films. That’s just one event of several that is designed to teach kids and their communities how they can make a meaningful impact on the environment by increasing recycling efforts. The A Bag’s Life website also provides resources for visitors looking for locations to drop off their plastic bags and films and information on how to host a recycling event.

Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN) tours Novolex's North Vernon plant.

Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN) tours Novolex’s North Vernon plant.

The APBA also focuses on encouraging innovation, particularly as it pertains to closing the recycling loop on plastic bags. Recently representatives from the APBA and employees from Novolex were joined on a tour of the North Vernon, IN closed-loop recycling plant, by Rep. Luke Messer (R-IN). This tour was an opportunity to show the Congressman just how innovative Novolex’s Bag-2-Bag program is.  This groundbreaking program takes 35 million pounds of recycled bags and films a year, cleans them, processes them and repelletizes them so they can be made into new plastic bags. It’s the definition of closed-loop manufacturing, and it all takes place at a plastic bag plant, putting a new face on the industry and modeling modern, sustainable manufacturing processes.

While the APBA continues to publicly protect the industry, as well as promote environmental progress and encourage innovation, they’d like to do more.  They just need your help to do it. Proactive educational efforts that highlight the plastics industry’s inherent commitment to innovation and environmentalism will help us all. With resources from other plastics partners the APBA could learn from and do more for the industry at large. We hope you’ll visit the APBA at NPE, where the organization will see what they can learn from you and share what you can learn from them.

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