Sunday, March 10th, 2013

Discarded Plastic Bottles Find Glittering New Lives as Chandeliers

Souda Bubble Chandelier-clear

Souda Bubble Chandelier-clear

After viagra no prescription noting that New York City’s Borough of Brooklyn is a hotbed of progressive design, a recent

brief article in the New York Times showed the work of a Brooklyn design group called Souda, a firm founded in the summer of 2012 by three graduates of Parsons the New School for Design (New York, NY). Though the firm’s website offers wood furniture and a selection of attractive porcelain vessels, the Times focused on Souda’s Bubble Chandelier, a luminous design brought to life by repurposing post-consumer plastic bottles.

Souda says the design was originally inspired by the cellular shape of soap bubbles. The PET (polyethylene terephthalate) bottles it uses to create the Bubble Chandelier are sourced through a partnership with Sure We Can, a Brooklyn non-profit that runs the only homeless-friendly can redemption center in New York City. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the chandeliers will be donated to Sure We Can to help improve its facility. The Bubble Chandelier is available in clear or green, as shown here.

Souda Bubble Chandelier-green

Souda Bubble Chandelier-green

It was recently announced by the National Association for PET Container Resources (NAPCOR) that the U.S. recycling rate for plastic water bottles in 2011 was up 19.7 percent over 2010, which is certainly good news. It’s also heartening to see the many new and creative ways that designers and artisans continue to find for reusing/repurposing discarded plastics products of all types. That they turn the discarded plastics into beautiful, useful products is a big bonus.

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